VFX Work desks

Posted on November 28th, 2007 in The Company, Working in CG, Technical by Marc Bourbonnais

Since we’re setting up our own studio, why not design our very own workspace? We had specific criteria:

  • Enough desk space for a keyboard, graphic tablet and two monitors (or one big HD monitor);
  • Independent electrical wiring;
  • A type of soft, indirect lighting;
  • Room for two supervisors or clients sitting around for assistance;
  • Desks that can be grouped for small to medium teams;
  • Extra room for books… or toys.

Here is the result; we call them “pods”:

 modus_pods_01.jpg

modus_pods_02.jpg

... Related posts :
...Hammers and nails
...After five months
...First Contract

9 Responses to 'VFX Work desks'

Subscribe to comments with RSS or TrackBack to 'VFX Work desks'.

  1. Philippe Desaulniers said,

    on 2007-11-29 at 9.14 am

    I’ve seen setups like these in at least to different companies in the Cité du multimedia. Looks like they are available off-the-shelf, the design I saw also comes with a gigantic daisy-like plastic thingy in the middle of the pod, that goes probably 8 feet high, and may have embedded lighting (not sure). Looks kind of tacky if you ask me, but maybe they sell it without the plastic daisy. Desks are probably smaller than what you are looking for, though.

    Did you see anyone selling the desks, or are you planning on having them custom built?

  2. Chris Johnson said,

    on 2007-11-29 at 12.24 pm

    Looks good Marc…..we made the horrible mistake here of putting up boards behind the computers for books and shelving. It’s totally divided the room and you can’t see anyone or what people are working on…really segregates the office….so don’t do that…leave it open!!!!

    Oh….and can I have the window seat? ; )

  3. Chris Johnson said,

    on 2007-11-29 at 12.25 pm

    Oh….is this where we comment on the lighting and rendering? I think you could have a little bit more ambient in the room. Shadows are a little harsh. ; )


  4. on 2007-11-30 at 9.49 am

    We’re in the process of having them custom built, they are quite big compared to what you usually see in terms of desk size. The closest I’ve seen for this type of desk is at EA Montreal. We need some sort of column in the middle for the wiring, everything comes from the ceiling. We’ll try not to be too tacky.

    I’ll have a picture of our prototype later today.

  5. Martin Winkler said,

    on 2007-11-30 at 12.28 pm

    While I like the shape of these desks and the thoughtful placement, there’s one issue, that popped right into my eye while looking at that picture: You seem to have the sides of the desks as solid wood plates, so you can’t adjust the height.

    Don’t you think that might become a bit of a problem on the long run? In our shop the smallest guy is 1.55m, while I’m 2.00m for example. That does require a different height of the desk, otherwise you run into serious backache issues.

  6. V-G said,

    on 2007-11-30 at 6.01 pm

    What about adjustable chair??? Might be easier to change the height of a chair than the one of the desk. With all the equipment that usually sits on the desktop and the wiring, you don’t want it to move…


  7. on 2007-12-02 at 12.19 pm

    Martin,

    You bring up an interesting point, but I don’t think I’ve seen a studio boasting adjustable desks. I would definitely go on a case-by-case basis if it becomes a problem. Chairs of course are fully adjustable.

  8. Martin Winkler said,

    on 2007-12-04 at 9.49 am

    The last place I worked at before opening my own shop had a system similar to those (even though they were from a different vendor iirc): http://www.leuwico.com/web_d/bildschirmap/go2/img/tec-b-03.jpg

    Basically hydraulics that could lift 2 24″ CRTs plus a class1 reference monitor. They were meant to enable artists to switch from a sitting pos to standing and back during the day. We used that feature mainly to adjust the tables once for the guy who was about to sit there.

    For our own place we skipped the whole hydraulic issue, because they are somewhat pricey. We got normal adjustable ones instead (IKEA, shame on us ;) ), which you calibrate once and then fix them..

    The advantage over fixed heights is, that tall people can sit upright while small ones dont have their feet hanging loose in the air or on some small footrests.. which is sort of bad for your general spine condition.

  9. André Michaud said,

    on 2008-01-07 at 12.07 pm

    Question de construire des meubles, ça me conviens!

    Toujours disponible!

    Mosaiika*

Post a comment